Smoking Know How - Canadian Beef | Canada Beef

Smoking

Smoking is one of the best ways to develop the natural flavours in beef. Low and slow is the key to scrumptious beef with deep smoky flavours that is so tender it meltsin your mouth. Smoking concentrates the flavours in the beef while creating a visually stunning finished beef dish.

HOW TO SMOKE A BRISKET

The following how to instructions are based on this recipe: KETTLE SMOKED BRISKET

For the Brisket:

1. Trim brisket, leaving ¼ inch (5 mm) fat cap on top, and make two ¾-inch (2 cm) deep scores across the grain of meat on one side of the flat at ½-to ¾-inch (1 to 2 cm) intervals. This will help make sure you slice it properly after the brisket is cooked (and you can’t see the grains as easily)

Note – The whole brisket can be cut into two separate pieces called the Point End and the FlatEnd.The following steps feature the Flat End cut.

 
2. Combine salt, pepper, granulated garlic, granulated onion, sugar, smokedpaprika, sweet paprika and dry mustard in a bowl. Season the brisket heavily, pressing the rub into the meat. Wrap brisket in plastic wrap, place on a bakingsheet or tray and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or for up to 12 hours.

To Cook:

3. Unwrap brisket. Place brisket on grill over the drip pan, fat cap up. Insert oven-safe digital meat thermometer into centre of roast. Close the lid and cook for 2 hours. Check the brisket. If it looks dry, brush or spray those areas with water to keep it moist. Rotate the brisket for even cooking. Add more wood chips if needed to maintain smoke.

4. Cook for 2 hours longer or until thermometer registers 140°F (60°C). Carefully lift brisket onto a large piece foil, keeping the fat cap up, and wrap into a packet, sealing around edges (this will steam the brisket, which will speed up the cooking time and keep the brisket moist).

5. Return the wrapped brisket to barbecue, close lid, and cook for 3 hours longer (for a total of 7 hours) until thermometer registers 180 to 200°F (82 to 93°C), and meat is tender in both the point (double) and the flat (single) sections. Check the tenderness by sliding a skewer (or thermometer) through the foil until there is zero resistance and meat feels very tender.
 

6. Transfer brisket to cutting board, open foil wrap and let rest for 20 to 30 minutes, or until roast has cooled 140°F (60°C). Carve across the grain into thin slices.
 

 
Tip: When moistening the brisket while cooking, you can use a mop, a pastry brush, a spray bottle, or even just a paper towel dipped in water.

Cuts used with Smoking

Large cuts such as Brisket, Roasts and Ribs are prime candidates for smoking, but even a Ground Beef burger can benefit from a hint of smoke. Whichever cuts you choose, always remember that time, patience and practice pay off —don’t be afraid to tweak your technique to suit your tools and tastes.

Brisket Pot Roast Boneless

Brisket Pot Roast Boneless

One of the most flavourful beef cuts, Pot Roast needs to be slowly simmered/braised for optimal tenderness. Brisket can also be cooked slowly on the grill by indirect heat or it can be smoked or made into corned beef.


Brisket Double Point End Deckle

Brisket Double/ Point End/ Deckle

The thicker section of the brisket that is ideal for barbecue smoking and for turning into pulled beef. Bold beefy flavour. Tender when slowly-cooked and thinly sliced. It is also good marinated and slow roast/pot-roast/braise.


IF USING A KETTLE BBQ

  1. Remove the top grill off the barbecue, and place an empty basket in the corner of the base. Fill one-third of the basket with cold charcoal, leaving room for the hot coals. Get a smaller amount of charcoal white hot in a chimney starter, and then place them in the one-third space left in the basket. The heat will slowly “snake” across the rest of the charcoal.
  2. Soak 2 cups (500 mL) wood chips in water for at least 15 minutes. Drain off water; scatter the soaked chips over the charcoal.Alternately, you can use large chunks of barbecue wood (such as hickory, mesquite, etc) without soaking.
  3. Place a small foil pan next to the basket and fill it with hot water.
  4. Fill a large foil drip pan with ½ inch (1 cm) water and place on base underneath where the brisket will go, then replace the top grill back on the barbecue. Close the lid, making sure the vent holes are on the opposite side of the charcoal (this will direct the heat and smoke to go over the brisket side of the barbecue), and preheat to 250°F. Soak more wood chips for replenishing as you cook.

 
Tip: When moistening the brisket while cooking, you can use a mop, a pastry brush, a spray bottle, or even just a paper towel dipped in water.

IF USING A PROPANE/GAS BARBECUE

  1. Soak 2 cups (500 mL) wood chips in water for at least 15 minutes. Drain off water and place wood chips in the smoke box (if your barbecue is equipped), or wrap in a square of foil in a package the size of a deck of cards and poke holes in packet to let smoke escape; place wood chip pack under grill (off to one side), directly on top of the burners.
  2. Place a small foil pan under the grill next to the wood chips; fill it with hot water.
  3. Fill a large foil drip pan with ½ inch (1 cm) water and place under the grill, on opposite the side of the barbecue from the wood chips (or over the burner furthest from the smoke box). Heat the side of the barbecue under the wood chips (or closest to smoke box) to low. Close the lid and pre-heat the grill to 250°F.Soak more wood chips for replenishing as you cook.

 
Tip: When moistening the brisket while cooking, you can use a mop, a pastry brush, a spray bottle, or even just a paper towel dipped in water.

Smoking Beef Tips

  • What’s the big deal about a ‘Smoke Ring’?It’s a badge of honor, the money maker or ‘the Stanley Cup’for true smoke pit aficionado’s. This is the pink layer near the meat’s surface, caused by a chemical reaction to wood smoke,whichis a sign of a great barbecue.

  • Use a meat thermometer to make sure smoke-cooked foods are done but not overcooked.Smoke-cooked foods look different fromother grilled or oven-prepared foods. They may be pink or red when completely cooked.For additional food safety at home tips, click here.
  • Use tongs and barbecue mittsto add charcoal, turn beef, refill the water pan, or adjust vents.
  • Do not use charcoal infused with starter fluid-it can add an unpleasant taste to your smoked foods.
  • Experiment with different woods and beef cutsuntil you find the right combination for your tastes.
  • Start with a small amount of woodto see howyou like the flavour, and thenadd more for more intense smoky taste. Try combining woods, as you get more experienced for unique and flavourful results.
  • Don’t lift the barbecue lid to take a peek. Two key elements for success is heat and smoke. Lifting the lid will release the heat and smoke. Only lift when you need to check the fire, add water to the pan or check the temperature. Make sure to do this all at once and quickly. Sit back and relax.